Wing Chun Singapore: Lesson 2 Footwork applications

Hi all,

In our previous lesson we covered our syllabus Level 1 types of footwork.

In this episode: Wing Chun Singapore: Lesson 2 Footwork applications, we will give some examples on how to apply your footwork. There are many types of footwork but they all share some common features: they all can be used to attack – defend – or take position. That is the topic of this lesson.

Body structure

Before we begin let us reiterate what we discussed in lesson 1.  It is super important to maintain your structure at all times. That is: correct physical structure, relaxed body and awareness of your centre of gravity (COG). If that is not enough, you must maintain these attributes as you move and at all times (!)

Having said this, lets now discuss the different footwork applications, attack – defence and take position.

Attack

When we talk about attacking your opponent, we consider three methods; bridge the gap, chasing and break structure.

When you start out a fight you usually are in a range where you have to step forward or shuffle step, to hit each other person. Then you must “bridge the gap” to attack your opponent. This can be achieved by most types of footwork e.g. step through, shuffle step Biu Ma, angle step.

If your opponent retreats on your attack, you can “chase” him. You can repeat or change your type of footwork of your initial attack or chase him with a kick. The latter is mentioned in Wing Chun Kuen Kuit: “every step is a kick”.

Last but not least, we can use footwork to break your opponents structure. This is the core of Chu Sau Lei Wing Chun strategy: if I compromise your structure you cannot attack or defend yourself. I can hit you at will, a free lunch! They don’t come that often.

No matter what type of footwork you use, you must be able to “move as one unit” to affect your opponent’s structure.

Defence or evasion

In Chu Sau Lei Wing Chun, we consider two ways of evasion or avoiding pressure. Big evasion uses footwork, for instance shuffle or step back in a straight line of sideways. In “small evasion” we use our body to evade or “run from pressure”. In this method, called “cotton body”, we delink or make our body soft when someone pushes or pressure our body or limbs.

Take position

Taking position is entering the correct range to apply your tool box. For instance: you want to kick but you are too near to execute a good kick or you want to elbow your opponent but he is too far away. Beginning students often “reach” or compromise their structure, the solution to this is of course to adjust your footwork and get into the proper range.

Another application is using your footwork to gain a dominant position. A position where you can control your opponent with minimum effort that gives you many options to hit or take him down.

How to train?

Hope I made clear that footwork is important and it pertains to every aspect of your Wing Chun training. It is trained in your sparring, drill etc. and if you don’t have a partner you can shadow box.

Conclusion

Footwork, at a more advance level is a dynamic concept. It is a continuous adjustment of the ranges in attack, defence and taking position.

The importance of footwork can be summarized in this quote:  “He who controls the range, controls the fight”.

All the best,

Steven Wang

Head Coach

Chu Sau Lei Wing Chun Singapore

Further Reading:

Wing Chun Lesson 1: Footwork basics

 

 

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Hi all,

In our previous lesson we covered our syllabus Level 1 types of footwork.

In this episode: Wing Chun Singapore: Lesson 2 Footwork applications, we will give some examples on how to apply your footwork. There are many types of footwork but they all share some common features: they all can be used to attack – defend – or take position. That is the topic of this lesson.

Body structure

Before we begin let us reiterate what we discussed in lesson 1.  It is super important to maintain your structure at all times. That is: correct physical structure, relaxed body and awareness of your centre of gravity (COG). If that is not enough, you must maintain these attributes as you move and at all times (!)

Having said this, lets now discuss the different footwork applications, attack – defence and take position.

Attack

When we talk about attacking your opponent, we consider three methods; bridge the gap, chasing and break structure.

When you start out a fight you usually are in a range where you have to step forward or shuffle step, to hit each other person. Then you must “bridge the gap” to attack your opponent. This can be achieved by most types of footwork e.g. step through, shuffle step Biu Ma, angle step.

If your opponent retreats on your attack, you can “chase” him. You can repeat or change your type of footwork of your initial attack or chase him with a kick. The latter is mentioned in Wing Chun Kuen Kuit: “every step is a kick”.

Last but not least, we can use footwork to break your opponents structure. This is the core of Chu Sau Lei Wing Chun strategy: if I compromise your structure you cannot attack or defend yourself. I can hit you at will, a free lunch! They don’t come that often.

No matter what type of footwork you use, you must be able to “move as one unit” to affect your opponent’s structure.

Defence or evasion

In Chu Sau Lei Wing Chun, we consider two ways of evasion or avoiding pressure. Big evasion uses footwork, for instance shuffle or step back in a straight line of sideways. In “small evasion” we use our body to evade or “run from pressure”. In this method, called “cotton body”, we delink or make our body soft when someone pushes or pressure our body or limbs.

Take position

Taking position is entering the correct range to apply your tool box. For instance: you want to kick but you are too near to execute a good kick or you want to elbow your opponent but he is too far away. Beginning students often “reach” or compromise their structure, the solution to this is of course to adjust your footwork and get into the proper range.

Another application is using your footwork to gain a dominant position. A position where you can control your opponent with minimum effort that gives you many options to hit or take him down.

How to train?

Hope I made clear that footwork is important and it pertains to every aspect of your Wing Chun training. It is trained in your sparring, drill etc. and if you don’t have a partner you can shadow box.

Conclusion

Footwork, at a more advance level is a dynamic concept. It is a continuous adjustment of the ranges in attack, defence and taking position.

The importance of footwork can be summarized in this quote:  “He who controls the range, controls the fight”.

All the best,

Steven Wang

Head Coach

Chu Sau Lei Wing Chun Singapore

Further Reading:

Wing Chun Lesson 1: Footwork basics

 

 

Please follow and like us:)
Contact Us
Facebook
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Google+
Google+
YouTube
Whatsapp

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wing chun singapore

Head Instructor Chu Sau Lei Wing Chun Singapore

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